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Tuesday, August 07, 2007

Butterflies



Yesterday evening we went for a walk with friends on the nearby Trans Canada Trail. At one point we came upon a large area of wildflowers called covered with Monarch butterflies. I have never seen so many at once. Many of the flowers had so many butterflies on them that we thought they were leaves at first. They did not seem to be eating. We thought they had just hatched out and were drying their wings. They seemed to be vibrating their wings and they were not very good at flying. It was easy to get right close to them and even touch them. In all the years we have lived here, we have never seen this before. We will probably go back again today but we think it may be a phenomenon that lasts only a few hours and then they all fly away. If that is so, we feel incredibly lucky to have arrived at just the right time. I looked up the purple flower in my plant book and it is a type of wild Liatris commonly called Blazing Star. The other darker one is Curly Dock, a common weed around here that is often used in dry plant arrangements.

19 comments:

dot said...

What an interesting photo. I remember seeing many of these butterflies as a child but never like this. I don't know if this is common for the monarch or not. Great photos.

Screen Door said...

Spectacular--- was the first word I thought of when I saw this photo. As a kid we would try to catch one-- always out of our reach...I've never seen anything liike this.

Exuberant Color said...

I am glad to see so many butterflies somewhere. We have had fewer and fewer butterflies in the last 4 or 5 years in northern Illinois. They used to be so thick you would run into a cloud of them when driving. Maybe we will be lucky enough to have more next year.
Wanda

Elaine Adair said...

My gosh, this is a Quilt-To-Be!!!

Judy said...

Can't seem to leave a comment for you today...this is my third attempt. If all three show up, please delete two so that I don't look quite so silly!
Love your butterfly pics. What an interesting phenomenon.
Glad you had a great trip to Minneapolis. You packed a lot into that weekend. Jean and Valori Wells from the Stitchin Post in Sisters, OR have a relatively new book out about home dec sewing, with duvet cover ideas. You may want to check it out.
OK, I'm crossing everything possible in hopes of finally publishing the wonderful comment onto your blog! LOL

xo

Laurie Ann said...

Wow, that is so cool! You are indeed blessed to have gotten a chance to see this. Thanks for sharing it with us!

quiltpixie said...

How beautiful! Being in the city with so much mosquito spraying we have few "bugs" of any kind...

Molly said...

How lucky to take THAT walk at exactly THAT time! Amazing pics!

meggie said...

Lovely butterflies! We used to have them, & they only liked Swan plant, in NZ. I occasionally see them over here, but have never seen anything like those clusters.

Molly said...

I was at the library and on my last few seconds of computer time when I left my comment. I've come back to drool, now that I'm home. I am insanely jealous! That top picture could surely win a photography contest. Not to mention that I'd like it on my kitchen wall where I could look at it all I want!

ancient one said...

Hey, Molly told us to come look at your butterflys. I have never, never seen so many in one spot. Thanks for sharing your pictures!!

Lily said...

Wow.

Lazy Gal Tonya said...

beautiful. glad there are still some wild areas for them to cocoon/eat/rest.

Libby said...

What a sight to see . . . how fortunate for you (and us) that you got the chance to see. Thank you so much for sharing.

katelnorth said...

wow - amazing butterflies. thanks for the photo!

Norma said...

Wow! What a stroke of luck to come upon such a sight!

Nicole said...

I live on the Monterey Penninsula in California. There is a town here called Pacific Grove that is known for the Monarch butterflies that stop every October during their migration. The trees are just packed full of these beautiful creatures resting before continuing their journey. It is the most incredible sight, and folks come from all over to see them. The town even has a big parade honoring the butterflies!

atet said...

How great -- I've see photos of large numbers of Monarchs as they begin their migration south, but to have seen that in person! Wow!

Rose Marie said...

How fortunate for you to see this sight! Thanks for sharing.